Goats & Sheep

The fee to adopt a goat or sheep is $20/month or $240/year*. If an annual adoption is out of your budget please consider making a one-time donation. All donations to Burleigh Manor go directly to supporting and caring for our animals.

*Donations can be paid in full (one payment) or paid over 12 monthly payments. You can select the option that suits you best when checking out.

Your $20/month donation will supply the following:

Goat Sheep
  • Goat Feed and Snacks
  • 12 Bails of Hay/Straw
  • Annual Veterinary Check-Up
  • Quarterly farrier service
  • Sheep Feed and Snacks
  • 12 Bails of Hay/Straw
  • Annual Veterinary Check-Up
  • Quarterly farrier service

Meet Our Animals

Mister

Mister was born in February 2013 at Blue Ridge Dairy Goats farm in Keedysville, MD. As a young goat, he served as an Eco-Goat clearing unwanted weeds from grasslands and neighborhood backyards. All was fine with his weed-clearing duties except that Mister often went ‘missing’ from the herd. His tendency to follow joggers home or join Frisbee tournaments, earned him his namesake Mister….”Hey Mister, get over here!” I am sure you can imagine, but it also made his adoring human mother, who makes sure all goats get treated with love and respect, was worried for his safety.

In December of 2015, Mister was relieved of his Eco-Goat duties and came to live at Burleigh Manor. He has made a great addition to the Burleigh Manor goat herd and is a new admirer of our only female, Lily G. He also loves to be around people probably because he previously was a regular visitor to farm camps and neighborhood holiday parties. This goat LOVES PEOPLE…and goats.

Adopt Mister

Marvin

Marvin and his brother Winston were brought to us by a university student whose assignment was to raise them and their mother as part of an animal science course. After caring for the mother ewe and birthing the twins, the student couldn’t bear the thought of sending them on to slaughter, or worse the university’s cafeteria, after the class was over. Instead, she found temporary residence for them at Baugher’s Farm in Carroll County and in October of 2014 both lambs arrived safely at Burleigh Manor. Marvin is a Katahdin sheep which is a short-haired, domestic breed of sheep developed in Maine during the 20th century. Marvin has a friendly personality and likes to take the lead. He has a particular fondness for eating and enjoys relaxing with the other sheep and animals at Burleigh Manor.

Adopt Marvin

Winston

Winston and his brother Marvin were brought to us by a university student whose assignment was to raise them and their mother as part of an animal science course. After caring for the mother ewe and birthing the twins, the student couldn’t bear the thought of sending them on to slaughter, or worse the university’s cafeteria, after the class was over. Instead, she found temporary residence for them at Baugher’s Farm in Carroll County and in October of 2014 both lambs arrived safely at Burleigh Manor. Winston is a Katahdin sheep which is a short-haired, domestic breed of sheep developed in Maine during the 20th century. He is a laid back sheep who enjoys relaxing and playing with the other sheep and animals at Burleigh Manor.

Adopt Winston

Spice

Spice is a Barbados Blackbelly sheep born on April 8, 2014 at a breeder’s farm. Due to white markings on his feet, he was considered un-registrable and therefore, could not be used for breeding. Instead of sending him to market, the breeder decided to donate the lamb to Burleigh Manor to live out his days. Spice belongs to a breed of sheep that resemble deer because they are “hair sheep” as to “wool sheep”. Spice is very sweet and is strongly bonded to our Tunis sheep, Honey.

Adopt Spice

Honey

Honey came to us in May 2014. He had been purchased from auction by a good Samaritan who wanted to spare the young lamb from slaughter. Unable to keep him, he brought Honey to Burleigh Manor to live out the rest of his days. Honey belongs to one of the oldest breeds of sheep in the US called Tunis. Tunis sheep, like Honey, are characterized by their creamy-colored wool and copper-colored faces and legs. Handsome and sweet, Honey has quickly adapted to being around people. He has bonded with our Siberian husky, Bruno, and our Barbados Blackbelly sheep named Spice.

Adopt Honey

Lily G.

Lily G. is a tricolor pygmy goat. She is 5 years old. She and her brother were purchased by the Howard County Conservancy as kids. He passed away a few years ago. About a year ago, she began head-butting some of the kids that came to visit (they have about 5000 people come thru each year). For this reason they felt they could no longer keep her. She has not head-butted anyone here since we’ve had her. She was the alpha goat at the Conservancy but she is at the bottom of the hierarchy here. She is the only female and is smaller than the boys but overtime may exert her real self. Pygmy goats live 8-12 years on average…slightly less than 15-18 years for other goats.

Adopt Lily G.

Mac

Mac arrived at Burleigh Manor in February 2013. He is a full-grown, mini Nubian goat, also known as a “Lop-eared goat”. His lop ear still bears the the slaughter tag from the Amish market he was rescued from. Just shy of death’s door, and completely infested with parasites, Mac was rescued just in time. Mac has come a long way from those days and can now be seen vigorously running up and down the playpen with his goat friends. Mac has quite a personality and is very good with people. Mac has a large appetite and likes any snacks that are presented to him!

Adopt Mac

Alpie

Alpie is a 3-year-old, large, male Alpine goat that was surrendered to Burleigh Manor with his companion, Faint. As a very young goat, Alpie belonged to a traveling group of animals that visited local school children. It is unclear exactly how long he belonged to the traveling group, but likely for less than one year. He was later adopted by a family and then surrendered to us when they could no longer care for him.  Alpie is very friendly but is definitely the “alpha” goat. This becomes especially apparent at feeding time. He is very curious and social and likes to be in the middle of any projects taking place on the farm. He also likes to peek in windows to see what is going on inside the house, probably in the hopes that he will be given a treat. He is a big fan of Ritz crackers and spiced wafer cookies.

Adopt Alpie

Faint

Faint is a 3-year old, very sweet, male fainting goat who was surrendered to Burleigh Manor with his pal, Alpie, when their owner could no longer care for them. He belongs to a domestic breed of goat whose muscles freeze up when startled. These painless “spells” cause Faint to fall over and appear as if he’s passing out. An interesting factoid is that fainting goats were originally bred to protect sheep. With a fainting goat in the flock, if coyotes or dogs threaten the sheep, the goat will collapse, distract the predator, and provide an easy meal while the sheep escape. Fortunately for Faint, he is safe from predators inside of our sanctuary and is rarely exposed to anything startling that would make him pass out. Faint enjoys hanging out with the other goats and chickens and snacking on his favorite treats…Ritz crackers and Cheerios.

Adopt Faint